By: Michael Ganci

Petition Calls for Seaver, Hodges Statues at Citi Field

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When you think about Citi Field, do you think there should be statues on the premises?

Well there is a contingency of people that do, as 284 signatures (as of 10:38 a.m. Tuesday) that think so, according to a petition filed here.

Here’s the plea, written by peition organizer Bill Hall from Newport, Oregon.

Dear Mr. Wilpon:

As we’re sure you’re well aware, the New York Mets will soon celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of one of the supreme moments in their history, the World Championship of 1969. The Mets seemed to transform themselves from Lovable Losers to Champions almost overnight, and while it was a true team effort in the best sense of the phrase, the contributions of two men stand out above the rest: Number 14, manager Gil Hodges, and Number 41, pitcher Tom Seaver. For this reason, we are respectfully encouraging you to commission a statue of these two baseball legends to be unveiled at Citi Field in 2019.

It’s been said that two great miracles took place in the Summer of 1969: Men walked on the moon and the Mets won the World Series. People still discuss which achievement is better remembered today. Although George Burns in the classic film “Oh God” declared that the 1969 Mets were his last miracle, neither the moon landing nor the Mets’ title were miracles in the supernatural sense: both were the result of focused hard work and dedicated team effort.

Gil Hodges, the quiet, strong first baseman of Brooklyn Dodgers legend, took over a team that had come to accept losing as part of its identity and quickly taught them to play together and win. He depended on his entire roster, but the supreme leader and talent among that group of young men was future Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver, who, like Hodges, served his country in the U.S. Marine Corps. In many ways, even beyond the numbers they wore, Hodges and Seaver were mirror images. It would be fitting and proper for the Mets to immortalize their contributions to this great franchise with a statue honoring them together.

As far as my opinion, I think the Mets are super selective with their retired numbers, so that’s enough. On the other hand, the Mets have a whole rotunda to honor Jackie Robinson, a player who never even dawned Mets’ orange and blue. What do you think?

Should there be a Tom Seaver and Gil Hodges statue at Citi Field?

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About Michael Ganci

Michael Ganci is the Co-Founder of the Daily Stache, along with Matthew Falkenbury. Since 2008, Ganci has eat, drank and dreamt all things Mets, and he’d have it no other way. Feel free to follow him on Twitter at @DailyStache.

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7 Comments

  1. Kathy C

    May 3, 2016 at 10:53 am

    There should’ve been a statue erected of Tom Seaver when Citi Field opened, and while both the Dodgers and Giants are part of Mets history (blue from the Dodgers, orange from the Giants), Jackie Robinson was NEVER a NY Met. It should’ve been named the Gil Hodges Rotunda, the statue of The Franchise placed outside the ballpark, and the resemblance of Citi Field to Ebbetts Field would’ve satisfied the Dodger-loving Fred Wilpon. The Mets always seem to do the wrong thing when it comes to public relations, and I’ve heard that Jeff Wilpon would entertain the Seaver statue once Tom dies. That itself says how f*cked up the Mets owners are. Ugh.

  2. DONALD FISCO

    May 3, 2016 at 11:19 am

    WHO EVER VOTED NO IS NOT ONLY NOT A MET FAN BUT ALSO NOT A BASEBALL FAN !

    • Steven Kypers

      May 3, 2016 at 5:28 pm

      Amen to that.

  3. Richard Ignelzi

    May 3, 2016 at 11:56 am

    Should have been done years ago. Along with something for Piazza, Doc, Straw, Koosman, etc.

  4. Ron

    May 3, 2016 at 12:11 pm

    Where is the petition?

  5. Steven Kypers

    May 3, 2016 at 5:33 pm

    I take nothing away from Jackie Robinson, but his presence is way too utilized in Citifield. The rotunda should never have been wrapped around Robinson. Casey Stengel or Gil Hodges would have made so much more sense as a namesake. The Mets PR department has screwed up time after time in regard to Mets tradition and history.

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